Goal: Soccer takes less time to recover than other sports. If these situations are not appropriately managed, they can induce persistent fatigue in the athlete, as well as an increase in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and a drop in athletic performance. Several therapies have been tried to increase athletic performance, reduce the percentage of injuries, and improve soccer results. Training and recuperation situations provide possibilities to develop solutions to this problem. Understanding the physiology of healing is critical for speeding up some processes and reducing recovery timeframes.

Subjects: Cryotherapy could help soccer players enhance their functional performance tests and reduce pain. Our research is conducted in the form of an experimental prospective study.

Twenty men between the ages of 17 and 23, who were members of a university men’s soccer team, took part in the study (10 experimental subjects and 10 control group subjects). Power, the number of leaps, the average height of a jump in a 30-second continuous jump test, and DOMS perception through visual analogue scale were all controlled factors (VAS). Both groups will be given a more active recovery and elongation by the coaching team. In addition, the experimental group will be subjected to three minutes of ice baths (42-47 °F).

Results: In the control group, we discovered substantial statistical differences in the number of jumps and the power of the same, resulting in improvements. The average jump height and percentage yield data showed no significant differences in either group. Significant variations were found in the assessment of DOMS, with the experimental group having a decreased sense of DOMS.

Conclusion: It may be inferred that the proposed strategy is effective in lowering DOMS, however it is difficult to establish its effectiveness in a short-term performance review. Ice baths improve various features of the 30-second continuous jump test, such as the sense of leg discomfort and exhaustion, and might thus be regarded a viable alternative in the treatment of these athletes.

Author(S) Details

Jair Burboa
Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación, Chile.

Felipe Godoy
Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación, Chile.

María Soledad Riquelme
Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación, Chile.

Eugenia Vivar
Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación, Chile.

Maximiliano Barahona
University of Chile, Clinical Hospital, Santiago, Chile.

Alvaro Zamorano
University of Chile, Clinical Hospital, Santiago, Chile.

Jaime Hinzpeter
University of Chile, Clinical Hospital, Santiago, Chile.

View Book:- https://stm.bookpi.org/IDMMR-V2/article/view/5439

Leave A Comment

Categories